Tuesday, January 20, 2009

Cautionary Tales


We have reached a hastier and superficial rhythm,
now that we believe we are in touch
with a greater amount of people,
more people,
more countries.
This is the illusion which might cheat us of
being
in touch deeply
with the one breathing right next to us.

The dangerous time
when mechanical voices, radios, telephone,
take the place of human intimacies,

and the concept of
being in touch with millions
brings a greater and greater poverty
in intimacy and human vision.

--Anais Nin, in 1972


4 comments:

Kato said...

Yes! this reminded me of a rich, inspiring website on Waldorf home education I found in my first month of having internet access. It basically said on the first page that "if you are reading this and there are children in your home who are not asleep, get up now, turn this off and go play/read/walk/be with them".

On the other hand, I was just talking to Kym today about how valuable such technology can be for people who are isolated from kindred souls (physically or otherwise).

I AM, however, cheating myself out of the natural rhythm of a good night's sleep again. Virtual farewells can be as drawn-out as living, breathing ones!

Indie said...

Oh, Kato, great quote:

"if you are reading this and there are children in your home who are not asleep, get up now, turn this off and go play/read/walk/be with them."

I just made it into my desktop background so I would read it every time I log onto the computer.

But what does a mom do to spend time with her kid if all he ever does is play video games? I hate video games.

Kristen said...

Wow, Indie, is That ever the truth of our society ... for the most part, anyway. A cautionary tale, indeed! I try very hard to maintain balance, and for some reason the computer always demands at loudest pitch (strange).

I hope your class went engagingly :)
Kristen

Indie said...

Kristen, sometimes I think it's my blog and blog friends -- the freedom to express my feelings and not in a vacuum -- that have helped me survive the last few months.

But I can feel its perilous compulsion too. I tried to stay away one day and I couldn't.

And I'm also aware that as I reach out this way, the truth is I'm alone and lonely.

Maybe it's just an introvert's comfortable extroversion, reaching out, but on one's own terms.

Or a way to express the best part of yourself, if the best part of yourself happens to be words and ideas.

"Kindred souls," as Kato calls them, are so hard to come by. How did we find one another before this?