Sunday, February 1, 2009

Ta-da!

Hooray, my afghan is finished!

I was extra motivated to finish it up so I could crochet myself some socks out of the pretty burgundy wool yarn I recently bought. The socks took only half as much yarn as the instructions called for, so I crocheted myself a scarf too!

Here is the afghan, with a cat and a laptop for perspective.
This is the life, wrapped in my afghan, wearing my wool socks, snuggling with a kitty.
Here is my scarf. Now that I'm an old pro at making fringe...

10 comments:

Kristabel said...

Very pretty! Looks comfy too. Congratulations on a non-addition to the Unfinished Projects box. xo

Indie said...

Thanks, it is comfy. It's been the first thing I grab lately when I get home after a hard day. It's really long and wraps all around you.

And don't worry, I have plenty of projects for the Unfinished Projects store...

Anonymous said...

Who is that beautiful dark furry sprite in the picture? Is that your guardian angel?

Indie said...

Yes, that is the warm, furry, purring creature that saved my life over the last couple of months of heartbreak. Along with all my friends and loved ones, that is. But Paris is always right there.

Ernie Branscomb said...

Good luck! The reward system works great for some people. The haitus worked for me. I found myself with extra time that I used for blogging, but I didn’t put forth any great effort.

My whole life I’ve approached life like “I have to accomplish this”. When I was a little kid I used to race to the corner of the driveway, and I would have to get to the corner before the truck that I could hear coming did or I imagined that something terrible would happen. Everything in my life has been a race or a competition, and it has always been a personal thing with me. After my wife and I got married, she had to convince me that I could take a vacation. I was sure that the world, and everything that I had done in it would fall apart if I stopped watching it.

Even though you saw me still posting, it was like being on vacation. When on a vacation, you still eat, you still breathe, you still talk, you still laugh. You still do most everything that you do at work. The difference is your frame of mind. You give yourself permission to relax. That was my “Haitus”, my reward.

Petra H said...

Wow, it looks absolutely lovely - I want an afghan too! I haven't knitted for the last 10-15 years, maybe I should take it up again (I remember that my grandmother had to finish my jumper...)?

Indie said...

Petra, thanks! I enjoy the relaxation of sitting there crocheting while watching movies.

The trouble is, I can't read or understand crochet instructions while I watch movies. So,it's hard to learn any new techniques.

I was thinking crocheting scarves for my friends would make nice gifts. Scarves don't take very long.

Petra H said...

Aha, so it wasn't knitted but crocheted - a technique I never learnt since my sewing teacher in school couldn't teach me, as a left-handed person to do crochet :-( Simple knitting I can do - but did you know that it is just like with languages, people knit in different ways in different countries!? So I wouldn't be able to knit according to American instructions, weird, isn't it!?
I am sure that your friends would love some hand-made scarves, what a lovely present!

Indie said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Indie said...

Petra, I tried to learn to knit, but couldn't get it. All the good non-blanket projects are knitted. It took me ages to find a pattern for crocheted socks. But I couldn't understand the directions for doing the heel, so I skipped it and made tube socks!

Yes, the directions are all full of abbreviations, so first a person would have to learn the equivalent terms in the language, then the abbreviations. Are techniques themselves also different among countries?

I always look longingly at your recipes, but I could never begin to make anything. The amounts are different (not cups and teaspoons). Come to think of it, it is kind of quaint that Americans still cook using cups and teaspoons as amounts! :)

Is potato-shrimp soup a Swedish dish? My dad's been making it since I was little. I am learning that all sorts of things from my life turn out to be Swedish traditions, passed down. Celebrating Christmas Eve with a smorgasbord (we never called it that, but that's what it was). for example.